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Cover Reveal- Elf Princess Warrior

Elf Princess Warrior high res

Elf Princess Warrior- Wildecoast Saga Book II b

Caught up in a vicious civil war, elven princess Gwaethe Arenil is desperate to save her faction and reunite her people. Help presents itself in the form of Captain Jacques Vorasava, the dashing human Brightcastle commander. But does Jacques’s aid come with more dangers than Gwaethe can endure, both for her people and her heart? This story continues themes from The Elf King’s Lady.

When I wrote The Elf King’s Lady, I realised I would be returning to  give Gwaethe Arenil her happily ever after. Gwaethe is the half-sister of Elf King’s Lady hero Kain Jazara and there was much left in his story, let alone Gwaethe’s. The exotic elven princess is determined to save her people and bring Kain into his rightful place as leader of the elven race.

Gwaethe was a major secondary character in Elf King and this is where she met Jacques Vorasava, the human she finds difficult to resist. They fought on the same side, creating a bond of respect and loyalty that laid the foundations for deeper feelings. But as they are thrown together a second time, Gwaethe begins to realise the yawning chasm that separates them.

Elf Princess Warrior is a story of inter-racial love set amidst the greater conflict of war. I hope readers enjoy the story as Gwaethe and Jacques navigate the treacherous territory of lust, love, war and political intrigue. Elf Princess Warrior will be available at the end of the year.

Please leave a comment below to go into the draw to win a copy of my most recent book, The Master and the Sorceress.

Until next week!

Bernadette x

 

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London- Part 1

JH 10Fresh from the Yorkshire Dales, which could not be topped- we thought- we headed to London on the train – a rather fast train which didn’t enable much sight seeing. We discovered a confusing system of seat booking which many travellers, including us, ignored. This led to the occasional travel rage amongst those who had actually tried to reserve a seat. I also left one of our tickets in the machine in Sheffield- so if you are travelling by train in the UK, please be aware that the machine spits out an extra summary ticket. Luckily I was able to have the missing ticket re-issued.

We had massive plans for our London visit, just as we did for all our travel- see as much as you can in the short time you are there. The skies were overcast and threatening rain as we checked into our hotel in King’s Cross. We immediately set off on foot to find the travel information booth where we could purchase our Big Bus tickets.

With three days of bus travel purchased, we jumped on the nearest Big Bus and took a tour of the city, taking in St Paul’s Cathedral, Tower Bridge, the Tower of London, and landmarks like the Shard, Big Ben and the London Eye. The city of London is an interesting mix of ancient and new. We soon determined our focus would be on the ancient and the Tower of London was pencilled in for the next day.

It was just our luck that Big Ben was getting a makeover – but then we realised it had been damaged in that episode of Doctor Who. You know the one. There was all manner of centuries-old architecture to admire including many pubs. But I couldn’t get over the ever present contrast between modern architecture and loved old landmarks.

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We finished our first day in London, uncertain of what the next day would bring and convinced that Yorkshire and Scotland were far superior.

GreenwichStay tuned for London Day 2, when we explore the Thames, Greenwich and the Tower of London.

Until next week!

Bernadette x

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James Herriot’s World

JH 10I was already in love with North Yorkshire – the dales, the stone houses, the narrow lanes and amazing views- but it was about to get even better.
As a child, my interest in being a vet was heightened by a certain television series called All Creatures Great and Small. The books and television program were set in this very region and the real-life practice that inspired the James Herriot phenomenon lies in Thirsk.

Alf Wright was the vet who wrote the best-selling books All Creatures Great and Small and its sister books, based on his life as a vet. He taught himself to type, and to write, and would record his veterinary stories each night after his long working day. I can’t even conceive of being able to do this, knowing the hours he would have been putting in. He named himself James Herriot after a football star at the time.
The practice is now a veterinary museum and tourists can explore the building, getting a sense of what life was like – the hardships of living in the Dales – not to mention practicing veterinary science there.

There is a bunker used to shelter during air raids,

a dispensary with all manner of weird and wonderful concoctions used to ‘treat’ animals

and outbuildings which have been turned over to a cinema and small film set.

The practice was more of a home, with many areas used for both family and business. Below you can see Mrs Pumphrey and her Pekingese, Tricky Woo.

The cosy breakfast room was the hub of the family and Alf would sometimes clear the table to perform surgery on one of his patients.

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Upstairs, where the bedrooms would have been, is housed a museum of veterinary instruments- a truly frightening array of hardware. Some of them are very similar to those modern vets still use.

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To top off the visit, St Mary’s Cathedral is just down the street. It’s a medieval church dating from 1480. I longed to have more time to learn about the building but we were due to head home.

And that was the fitting end to a fun-packed visit to The Dales! I’ll never forget it…

Stay tuned for next week’s adventure when we take on London!

Bernadette x

 

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James Herriot Country- North Yorkshire

After revelling in the delights of Chatsworth palace and gardens, we decided to escape, this time to James Herriot country- North Yorkshire. We had a sneaky day before we left for three days in London. That night was spent at The Rock Inn.

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Fortified by their full English Breakfast, we embarked on a fun day touring the Yorkshire Dales. We drove up and up, along narrow lanes…

through classic Yorkshire villages…

and discovered a lake/tarn on a large open tableland. It was 10 degrees Celsius and windy on this late spring day.


Heading out from the tarn, the local flock of sheep blocked the road. It really is true what they say about sheep. What a delight!


We couldn’t get enough of the expansive vistas. Around every bend was another feast for the eyes and soul!

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You could imagine James Herriot trekking across the paddocks in search of a sick sheep! It was also obvious how inhospitable these hills would be in winter- brrrrr!

There were so many stone fences and peaceful streams and magnificent trees.


I was excited to catch a pleasant pheasant in the wild. He was very obliging, allowing us to get very close.

Pheasant

North Yorkshire was truly magnificent in spring. I want to go back and see everything we missed. You should too!

Next week I head to James Herriot’s old veterinary practice and you get to see a little of the man who inspired me to be a vet!

Until then…

Bernadette x

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Chatsworth House

Chats 17Chatsworth house was another spectacular sight in a whole list of them in our first week in the UK. It was a short drive from our base in Dore, Sheffield and we went with our son, Tom and his partner, Monique. The weather was magnificent and so was this stately home. We were permitted to take any photos we wished and took full advantage of the invitation.
While Michael and I toured the palace, Monique and Tom saved a few pounds and checked out the gardens. I was totally overwhelmed by the opulence of Chatsworth House. Sculptures, huge paintings and other treasures abounded. Even the ceilings were works of art.

I was fascinated by the paintings which took up all the walls of one of the main staircases, the ceiling of which was a magnificent dome.


My imagination was captured by several displays which I have included here.

Some of the rooms were a little dark to photograph well but there was still plenty to add to my iphone.

Chats 13The formal dining room was perfection as you can see below. Not a detail was missed, even in the ceiling.


There was a whole room of statues on the way out to the gardens.

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We found Tom and Monique lounging in the sun with plenty of other sight seers. I’ll let the photos speak for themselves.

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The maze was my favourite part of the gardens after the stunning flowers.

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I’ll leave you with two stunning images- the first looking from the mansion up to the head of the water feature and the second looking in reverse. Enjoy!

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Please join me next week when we hit the road again, this time it’s North Yorkshire!

Bernadette x

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Aston Hall and Bakewell

 

Blair 9We were sad to be leaving Scotland but looking forward to our first weekend of cricket. It so happened that our first Saturday of English cricket coincided with the royal wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. The small hamlet of Aston Hall was the site of the match and the clubhouse was buzzing with eager ladies, keen to catch the first glimpse of Meghan and her wedding gown.

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Of course, with our eldest son playing in the match, I was conflicted about whether to watch the wedding or the cricket- the cricket won. I did see the start of Meghan’s walk down the isle and thought she looked fabulous.

Tom scored 70 or so runs and our team won. With the weather scorching hot at 23 degrees Celsius, extra drinks were ordered during the match. And the drinks were cordial, not water. On top of that, all the ladies had shed their jumpers and wore strappy tops and sundresses. Meanwhile, I was rugged up in jacket and scarf, as a chilly breeze made it comfortable to sit in the sun! Such a different experience from our late spring weather!

 

Michael and I enjoyed a walk into the village centre. I jumped at any chance to see the quaint English homes.

Sunday saw us spend some lovely time with Tom, exploring the local countryside. Bakewell was our destination, after a sleep in and brunch. This lovely tourist town was teeming with visitors walking the street, partaking of an ice-cream and watching the trout in the river. We drove past Chatsworth House and determined to come back the next day to explore the stately home.

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And that’s where I leave you. Stay tuned for the best of Chatsworth House next week!

Bernadette x

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Scotland Bound – Part 3

Loch 5The mystery of Loch Ness and castle Urquhart certainly deserved a whole day of exploration, but we were headed for our last Scottish B and B, in Inverness. With our hearts full of snow-capped mountains and castle ruins, we partook of a pub dinner and a good night’s rest.

 

We headed off before breakfast and stopped at The House of Bruar, by way of more stunning mountains. This place is hard to describe but here goes. The main purpose of the House of Bruar is to showcase Scottish produce, especially that in the immediate locality. I could have spent hours there, exploring all they had to offer, including bread, cheeses, meat, sweets and fruit and veg. The most impressive sight was rooms and rooms of upmarket Scottish clothes, including kilts and jackets. We had breakfast at the restaurant and sampled our first black pudding- delicious.

Just up the road from The House of Bruar was Blair Castle, Queen Victoria’s favourite Scottish retreat. The castle dates from the 1200s, perfect for my research of medieval life. As with all castles, this one had been renovated numerous times. Sad to say, we were not allowed to take photos inside until we reached the grand hall, which people will recognise from the mini-series, Victoria with Jenna Coleman.

The grand hall was the last venue before leaving the castle and contained dozens of antlers and spears as well as swords and plenty of lords. It is now the venue for weddings and can comfortably seat 220 guests. Imagine having your reception in the same hall in which Queen Victoria hosted her parties!

The woods near castle Blair are the home of gigantic trees and a picturesque river, not to mention the family burial crypt and a chapel. My greatest regret will be not being able to take photos of all the rooms we visited.

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On the way back to England, we skirted Edinburgh via this bridge, The Queensferry Crossing, and slipped back over the border. We will return to explore more of this magnificent country!

Felton pub
Our last night of this Scottish jaunt was spent in Felton, Northumberland. We could see the pub from our B and B. This charming tiny country hamlet was the perfect spot, just off the A1. The next morning, it was back to Yorkshire and a day of cricket!
I didn’t imagine our UK experience could get any better than Scotland, but more amazing adventures were just days away!
See you next week…
Bernadette x

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Scotland Bound – Part 2

Edin 1I left you last week, having taken so long to explore Lowther castle that we arrived in Edinburgh late afternoon. This city is one we must come back to, especially to discover Edinburgh castle which is perched on a hill in the centre of the city. I’d also love to stop and see The Kelpies – they are 30-metre-high horse head sculptures, completed in 2013.

 

The next stop heading north was midmorning at a beautiful little town called Callander. There was a picturesque river winding its way past the shops and a council worker stopped to tell us a little about the area. After a quick coffee, it was up and up to the Scottish Highlands.

There was still snow on the Bens- beautiful- and walkers everywhere! In fact, walking in summer in the UK seems to be the favourite past time. Around every corner, there was a cluster of cars from those who were off trekking the hills.

Back to Scotland- I lost track of the magnificent mountains as panorama after panorama opened before us. I was so blown away by the beauty, I almost forgot to take photos with the Budgy Smuggler hat. We stopped at a Scottish Commando memorial tucked away in a huge valley- what a moving tribute to the service of those men!

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And where there are mountains, there are lochs. I was incredibly excited to see Loch Ness which has its own castle ruins- Urquhart. I walked the length of the ruins and climbed to the ramparts, snapping photo after photo and imagining what it was like before it was blown to smithereens. I didn’t see Nessie.

There were many battles fought over that piece of real estate and in the end, Castle Urquart’s owners fled, blowing it up so it could never become a refuge for their enemies – so very difficult to imagine today. I didn’t want to leave but we were due in Inverness to spend the night.

Castle BlairAnd that’s where I end this week. Loch Ness and Castle Urquhart deserve a feature of their own!
See you next week when we discover Blair Castle!
Bernadette x

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Scotland Bound- Part 1

back Yard 2Our flights from Brisbane to the United Kingdom, landing in Columbo, Abu Dhabi and Manchester, could not be said to have been without event but finally we were at our ultimate destination- Dore, Sheffield. And while this part of the world has oodles of old-world charm, we had a mission to achieve. Scotland.

Aided by Tom and Monique, we planned a 4 night get-away, based on their road trip the year before. Airbnb was the site we used to book each night’s accommodation and the venues were affordable and suitable. The next morning, we hired a Mini Cooper and began our northern quest.

Windermere was our first night’s stop- a short 200 kilometre drive NNW from Dore. The countryside was magical- narrow lanes, stone fences and lots of sheep. The houses we passed were often stone with slate roofs. Our B and B room with its private ensuite, sat perched a short walk up the hill from Lake Windermere. Breakfast was taken underground in a charming breakfast room in the basement. And so began the first of many walks we would undertake on our three week holiday- broken only by our lazy days watching the cricket.

Lake Windermere was very pretty with small islands dotted across the lake and plenty of water birds and local perch and brown trout. We had a walk through the cemetery and partook of a massive cheese platter. I discovered Chile produces a very decent Sauvignon Blanc and continued to enjoy it throughout the UK!

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Off early the next day, our destination was Edinburgh. On the way, we stopped at Lake Keswell, enjoying more water fowl and a beautiful view of the lake, not to mention a lovely walk.

Then it was on to Lowther castle which was completed in 1812. The castle has a varied history, playing host to royalty and nobility for a century or more before being abandoned.

At one stage in WWII, it was occupied by the army and in 1957 it was partly demolished. Today, the castle ruins stand beside a grand façade and the only occupants are the castle gardens. The gardens and fields are extensive, however, and well worth a walk.

Having taken so long to explore Lowther castle, we arrived in Edinburgh late afternoon and decided that this city would need to be explored another time. However, we did discover Edinburgh castle- perched on a hill in the centre of the city – as we drove out next morning. And the Kelpies fascinated me- they are 30 metre high horse head sculptures, completed in 2013.

And that is where I leave you this week- on the way to the Scottish highlands. Stay tuned for beautiful snow capped mountains when I continue my Scottish adventure next week.

Bernadette x

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Our UK Adventure

IguanasYou will remember I left you last week as we arrived back in Brisbane after a wonderfully relaxing Island Hopper cruise with P & O. We had a week back in Brisbane to prepare for our three weeks in the United Kingdom. My husband and I had never been on a long-haul flight before and were anxious about how we would cope.

columboIt was not good news when we were told our 10.30 pm departure would be delayed a couple of hours and then we would have to stop off in Columbo and collect a new flight crew. Still, I settled back to enjoy catching up on movies such as The Greatest Showman and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. As an author, it’s vital to fill the creative well and inflight entertainment is the perfect vehicle. I loved both movies. I also re-watched the first Twilight movie somewhere along the line and only wish I could have watched all three.

Our arrival in Abu Dhabi was met with the news that we had missed our flight and would be hosted free of charge in Etihad’s Crowne Plaza Hotel. A nuisance sandstorm stopped us from appreciating the beauty of the city. We enjoyed two meals and a lovely four-hour sleep then returned to the airport to resume our journey.

Finally, eighteen hours late, we landed in Manchester and were met by Tom, our oldest son. We were to base ourselves in Dore, Sheffield. The countryside we travelled through was immediately so different to home. I loved the stone walls and sheep and the lovely flowers and stone houses. There is something about natural stone that really speaks to me.

The home we were to stay in was cosy with a cute little private English garden and pear and apple trees in front. How great would it be to be able to pluck a fresh apple from a tree on your way to work? We explored the immediate surrounds and then Tom’s partner, Monique, helped us plan our Lake District and Scotland adventure.

And that’s where I leave you this week. Stay tuned for the first of our trips north from Sheffield.
Bernadette x